Datrianna Meeks has been on our radar since we first profiled her back in 2015 as part of 28 Days of the Web. Since then, she’s been making some tremendous strides in her career, leading up to her current position as a senior product designer at Spotify.

Our conversation started off with Datrianna walking us through a typical day at work, and we spoke about the NYC design and tech scene and about her inspiring design journey. She’s also a podcast fanatic, so we also talked about #AmpedBrunch, an event she recently hosted for women of color in podcasting. Datrianna is really carving out a space for herself in this industry, so keep an eye out for her!

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Senongo Akpem is a brilliant art director and illustrator currently in New York City. What I love about Senongo’s work is how he mixes futurism along with his Nigerian culture to create really fantastically creative projects.

We started off by discussing two of his most well-known projects — Pixel Fable and Holo Halo. From there, Senongo walked me through his early career, explained how his time in Japan helped shaped him as a designer, and gave some really sharp critiques on the current design community. Senongo is one of the very first designers I reached out to back in Revision Path’s early days, so our interview today feels like a real full circle moment. I think you’ll really get a lot out of this episode. Enjoy!


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Revision Path is sponsored by Facebook Design. No one designs at scale quite like Facebook does, and that scale is only matched by their commitment to giving back to the design community.
Facebook Design logo
Revision Path is also sponsored by Hover. Visit hover.com/revisionpath and save 10% off your first purchase! Big thanks to Hover!
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Revision Path is brought to you by MailChimp. Huge thanks to them for their support of the show! Visit them today and say thanks!
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Our Slack community is filled with talented designers and technologists, and that’s where I first met Amélie Lamont. Amélie is a product designer in New York City who is one-third of the team behind Good for PoC, a directory of tech companies which are inclusive and safe for people of color.

Our conversation began with Amélie talking about the inspiration behind Good for PoC, and how the site has been received by the community. From there we talked about “Not a Black Chair”, her account of discrimination, sexism and racism at Squarespace. We also discussed Amélie’s past work as a certified health and wellness coach, and she shared what she does for self care, what attracts her to mentorship, and how she’s pursuing her career goal of being a design anthropologist. I love that Amélie is so outspoken, so I hope her work inspires you to speak up as well!


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Revision Path T-Shirt

The Revision Path Store is now open! Buy specially branded t-shirts, mugs, and buttons and help support the show!

Save $5 off $30 by using the promo code 5JULY at checkout! Offer goes from July 5 – July 12.


Revision Path is sponsored by Facebook Design. No one designs at scale quite like Facebook does, and that scale is only matched by their commitment to giving back to the design community.
Facebook Design logo
Revision Path is also sponsored by Hover. Visit hover.com/revisionpath and save 10% off your first purchase! Big thanks to Hover!
Hover logo
Revision Path is brought to you by MailChimp. Huge thanks to them for their support of the show! Visit them today and say thanks!
MailChimp logo

tolu-edionwe

Coding bootcamps have risen quickly as a destination for people looking to learn in-demand software engineering skills. Compared to degree programs, they are a lesser investment of time and money. Many bootcamps are also connected with employers and provide a place to source talent. While they can be a stepping stone to a tech career, that is by no means a guarantee and it requires careful navigation to make the leap from student to professional developer.

Tolu Edionwe, 22, is looking to make this leap. A 2015 graduate of Grinnell College, a liberal arts college in Iowa, she returned to her hometown of New York City and completed a three-month web development intensive course at the New York Code and Design Academy (NYCDA). Once the only girl on her high school football team, she is now taking on the notoriously male dominated software engineering industry. I spoke with her about why she chose to learn to code after completing a sociology degree, what coding school is like, and what advice she would give anyone thinking about going down the same path.